Things I Tell Myself Everyday

In todays ever more regulated and scrutinised healthcare environment, it is very easy to throw our arms up and give up on trying new ideas a.k.a innovation. Here are things I tell myself daily to fight that temptation:

  1. If you always do what you’ve always done, you will always get what you’ve always got.
  2. Everyone has ideas. A few have the audacity to act upon them.
  3. An idea on the ground is worth ten in the head.
  4. If everyone backs your idea at the start, maybe it’s not really there, yet.
  5. If everyone is opposed to your idea after you’ve had your say, maybe it’s not there yet, either.

If you have ever been seized by an idea, you’ll know the unmistakable feeling fluttering in your gut. I have learnt that when I stop asking ‘What If?’ and stop experimenting with new ideas, I lose interest in the people and work around me. So I fight the temptation to automatically go with what’s comfortable or convinient.

It takes a brave mind to enter unchartered waters, it takes a tough heart to stay the course.

Advertisements

CCIO: Crossing the Chasm

In summer 2011, E-Health Insider luanched the Chief Clinical Information Officer (CCIO) Campaign. It called for NHS organisations to consider appointing a CCIO to champion Information Communication Technology (ICT) projects and the use of information to improve healthcare.

On the first of September 2013, I took off my cloak of clinical manager to don a new set of responsibilities under the title of CCIO. I have crossed the chasm and decided to explore relatively unchartered territory in my organisation. In my first month in the new role, I have noted that the role of CCIO is still shrouded in a veil of mystery due to its infancy in UK healthcare.

I have therefore created the below infographic to hopefully give a flavour of what I am tasked to achieve: Continue reading “CCIO: Crossing the Chasm”

The Role of the Clinician in Digital Healthcare

As a self professed geek, I have to say that I am pleased to see so much interest in technology’s role in healthcare a.k.a e-health. One of the things that I like about the current direction of travel is the increasing involvement of clinicians in informing and driving e-health.

I am also aware that others are not so keen on the increasing use of technology in healthcare, for various reasons. Instead of widening the gap between those of us who do and those who do not believe that technology will revolutionise healthcare, I have made a personal and professional choice to share my experiences of driving efficiency and service improvement using technology. I am doing this in the hope that it will open up channels for more dialogue and debate to explore the drivers and barriers to wider adoption at scale.

Having just recovered from the E-Mental Health Conference that I helped to host last month, the coming months are going to be very interesting as I present the ‘My Journey’ Youth Mental Health App and hear others’ experiences of using technology in healthcare. I am going to be listening and speaking at the following events:

  1. HC2013 National Health IT Conference on 17th April where I will be speaking about the evidence for mobile health at the ICC Birmingham;
  2. Royal Society of Medicine Using Apps to Transform Healthcare on 18th April;
  3. Live Information Exchange Webinar with Vancouver Island Health Authority on 23rd April (Password: Youth);
  4. The Nursing Stream of the Chief Clinical Information Officer  Campaign in London on 13th June;
  5. Medicine 2.0: Social Media, Mobile Apps and Web 2.0 in Medicine, Health and Biomedical Research  taking place in London on September 23-24;
  6. International Youth Mental Health Conference which will look at how young people are influencing services and the role of technology in youth mental health;

I hope I get to see some of you at the above events or engage with you via my Twitter handle: @S_Amani.

Harnessing the Power of Digital for Better Mental Health

Three months ago, I received a call and my mission, if I chose to accept it, was to bring together thought leaders who are active in the mental health digital and social media arena. It was with total and unashamed glee that I accepted this request to arrange an event to explicitly celebrate the increasing role of technology in mental health care.  

It just so happens that I had been working with some inspirational leaders to drive for the first UK E-Mental Health strategy, so the timing couldn’t have been better.The details were scant enough to allow my creativity to guide how this event would play out. Continue reading “Harnessing the Power of Digital for Better Mental Health”